News

Tabor College Faculty Lecture set for April 8

April 02, 2014

Categories: General News

Tabor College is pleased to announce that Dr. David A. Loewen will present this year’s Dr. Richard G. Kyle Faculty Lecture. Loewen will speak on the topic, “Is there a relationship between what I value and how much my students learn?”

The lecture will take place in the lobby of the Wohlgemuth Music Education Center at 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 8. It is free and open to the public.

“I’m sharing on this topic because it involves the findings of my doctoral research,” Loewen says. “But more importantly, I’m sharing because I think that much of education focuses on techniques, methods and how that affects learning. We often don’t think about how what we believe is important may affect our students’ learning.”

Dr. Loewen graduated from Kansas State University with a Ph.D. in curriculum and instruction in the spring of 2013.

Since 2006, Loewen has been employed in his present position of Assistant Professor of Education and Coordinator of Secondary Education and Licensure Officer at Tabor College.

The Dr. Richard G. Kyle Faculty Lecture Series is an annual event founded to encourage scholarship and to recognize the work of a Tabor College faculty member.

Lifelong Learning Session on April 4 - “Stories from an Old Town”

March 31, 2014

Categories: General News

Tabor College welcomes Phyllis (Hiebert) Martens to Lifelong Learning at 9:45 a.m. on April 4 in the Wohlgemuth Music Education Center on the Tabor College campus in Hillsboro. Martens will present a session entitled “Stories from an Old Town.”

Martens, from Fresno, Calif., will share stories from her grandmother, Helena Jungas, when she lived in rural Mountain Lake, Minn., during the 1920s and 30s. Martens spent several summers there – working in the town hospital, attending a conservative Mennonite Brethren church and listening to her grandmother’s stories about old times.

From these experiences, Martens recently wrote a book entitled “Stories from an Old Town.” During the Lifelong Learning session, she will bring characters from the book to life—triggering your own memories of unique people in Midwest towns.

The folks she met there became characters in some of the stories. Martens says of the book, “Other characters are imported from other small towns, or are simply made up.”

An interesting addition, at the back of the book, is a glossary of Low German expression that she includes in the conversations of her characters—some of us remember these colorful, everyday expressions.

Martens is the oldest daughter of J.N.C. and Anna Hiebert, missionaries to India, where she grew up. The family returned to the United States during World War II and lived in Reedley, Calif. for four years. When the family returned to India, Phyllis went to Tabor College and graduated in 1950 with a degree in English and a minor in music. She then went onto attend Kansas University where she got her master’s degree in English.

In 1955, while teaching English at Pacific Bible Institute in Fresno, Calif., she met Elmer Martens, a seminary student from Canada. The two married and Elmer served as pastor of Butler Mennonite Brethren Church in Fresno. He then earned his doctorate in religion (Old Testament) from the Claremont Graduate School and returned to teach at Mennonite Brethren Biblical Seminary in Fresno. Martens continued teaching English in southern California and published four English as a Second Language (ESL) teaching games.

The couple has extensively traveled abroad on church-related missions. They have four children, the youngest being daughter Karen Bartlett, who is an admissions coordinator at Tabor College in Wichita. Her husband, Dr. Rick Bartlett, works as the director of theological education also at Tabor College in Wichita.

The public is welcome to attend all Lifelong Learning sessions and may register at the door. Fees are $4 per session or $15 per semester, or $29 per couple. Attendees may enjoy lunch in the Tabor College cafeteria after the sessions at the discounted price of $4.

For more information, contact Connie Isaac, Director of Lifelong Learning at (620)-947-5964 or conniei@tabor.edu. The semester schedule and a downloadable PDF of the brochure are available at www.tabor.edu/about/lifelong-learning.

Tabor College in Wichita launches Entrepreneurial Ministry Leadership Master of Arts degree program

March 28, 2014

Categories: General News

Tabor College in Wichita is proud to announce the launch of their new Master of Arts in Entrepreneurial Ministry Leadership (EML) degree. The new program was approved as accredited on February 25 by the Higher Learning Commission.

The program is enrolling now and the first classes will be held in a one-course-at-a-time cohort format beginning this fall.

This 39 credit hour program will be offered in an innovative hybrid/online format with a learning platform designed to provide educators, administrators and students with a secure and integrated education system.

People interested in this program would include: pastors, missionaries, church-planters, visionaries, youth pastors, entrepreneurs and staff members who are preparing for new and richer areas of service. It also will serve those people who have a passion for ministry and want to be trained for the church of tomorrow.

The EML degree can be completed by most students in 21 months.

Dr. Rick Bartlett, director of theological education at Tabor College in Wichita says, “This program will combine ministry passion with practical training to help graduates minister in their local community.

“It will equip them to move a project from idea to implementation to evaluation. Students will be prepared to think creatively, read and navigate the future, and evaluate their own culture by experiencing a cross-cultural environment. This master of arts degree is definitely outside the status-quo for theological programs,” added Bartlett.

The philosophy of the program is to embed theological reflection and thinking into every course.

Students will be challenged to reflect on their own embedded theology. This degree will serve as one which will inspire, motivate and serve the basic needs of people.

“This new graduate degree is indicative of Tabor College’s commitment to innovative programming,” said Dr. Frank Johnson, vice president of academic affairs and chief academic officer for Tabor College. “It also is a novel approach to serving our many faith-based communities while staying true to our historical and theological distinctives. I am especially thankful for Dr. Bartlett’s leadership of this initiative.”

Tabor College in Wichita chose to offer this degree program for a very specific reason.

“In response to community input, we are delighted to be approved to offer this new masters degree,” said Dr. Brett Andrews, executive vice president of Tabor College in Wichita. “It is designed to equip students with critical skills in both organizational effectiveness and practical ministry. This will become the degree of choice for students seeking a globally relevant ministry experience.”

There are a number of pieces that make this program distinctive.

Students will be able to select a focus of concentration for eight credit hours. They will be paired up with a faculty mentor who will work with them to assign readings, conferences to attend, or massive open online courses (MOOC) to take that help the student with his or her concentration specialty.

They will also have the opportunity to travel overseas and experience a culture outside of their own. This will only enhance their degree and knowledge of ministry and leadership among their peers.

Tabor College president Dr. Jules Glanzer said, “Rick Bartlett deserves the credit for developing a creative, innovative and relevant program that will serve the church that is and will be.

“Since our existence, Tabor has served the church in equipping men and women for service. Being approved to offer a graduate degree in theological and ministry education is another step in Tabor continuing to fulfill its mission of preparing people for a life of learning, work and service for Christ and His kingdom,” added Glanzer.

Students who enroll in the EML program will complete a major entrepreneurial project in their local community. This project will allow them to apply what they have learned in the classroom. This final project will provide an assessment of the overall degree and ensure that the objectives for the program were reached.

Dr. Bartlett says that this degree will help people want to go out and make a difference locally and globally.

“Every time we turn on the news, we recognize the needs of so many people going unmet on a daily basis. Sometimes we get overwhelmed by seeing these images all the time and it’s easy to get paralyzed and do nothing, even though we want to respond,” said Bartlett. “The EML degree will equip Christian leaders with both the eyes to see, plus the skills and knowledge to respond to global and local needs.”

Prospective students wanting more information about the EML degree should visit our website at online.tabor.edu or email Dr. Rick Bartlett at rickb@tabor.edu or call us (800) 546-8616.

For a video presentation about the EML degree, please click here.

Tabor College Women’s Choir set to perform home concert April 6

March 26, 2014

Categories: General News

The Tabor College Concerto Bella Voce Women’s Choir is set to perform a home concert at 4:00 p.m. Sunday, April 6 at Parkview Mennonite Brethren Church located at 610 South Main in Hillsboro.

The group traveled to four states on their annual spring break tour and performed eight concerts with the theme “Lift Thine Eyes” March 16-23.

The choir is under the direction of Janie Brokenicky and accompanied by Jennifer Epp, who is a Tabor alumna from Hillsboro, Kan.

Brokenicky is in her second year as assistant professor of choral music at Tabor College. She is the founder of the Concerto Bella Voce Women’s Choir and teaches private voice, in addition to courses in music theory, sight singing and ear training.

Comprised of 19 women, the group is excited to share their musical talents and love of Jesus Christ with listeners.

“The theme is centered around the message in Psalm 121 and the program includes the piece ‘Lift Thine Eyes’ from Felix Mendelssohn’s oratorio, Elijah,” says Brokenicky.

“The program also features flute and percussion performed by six students within the group,” added Brokenicky.

Tabor College Concert Choir set to perform home concert March 30

March 26, 2014

Categories: General News

The Tabor College Concert Choir is set to perform a home concert at 4:00 p.m. this Sunday, March 30 at the Hillsboro Mennonite Brethren Church located at 300 Prairie Pointe in Hillsboro, Kan.

The choir, under the direction of Dr. Brad Vogel, professor of choral music, will perform the concert with the theme “I Lift My Voice.”

“The voice is a primary means of communicating our relationship with God, in both song and speech,” Vogel said. “The texts of the songs divide into three modes of communication: praise, prayer and proclamation. Each song is either a setting of scripture or a personal expression of relationship with God.”

The choir’s repertoire spans the gamut of sacred choral music, from Renaissance, Baroque and Classical motets, to contemporary sacred choral music by British, Australian, French and American composers.

A variety of accompaniment instruments will be featured in each concert, including piano, oboe, trumpet and a string quartet. Student instrumental performers include Zach Neumann, Janelle Rust and Megan Wiebe on piano, Benjamin Wiens on oboe, Matthew Wiebe on trumpet, and a string quartet of Ryan Loewen and Cheyenne Derksen on violin, Rachael Wedel on viola and Natalie Wiens on cello.

Noted for the vitality of its singing and clarity of expression, the Concert Choir has been selected to perform for the Kansas Music Educators Association State Convention five times under Vogel’s direction. It has been a guest choir twice on the Wichita State University campus, as well as selected to sing for the inauguration of Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback.

Vogel notes the focus of the concert as a “sermon in choral music.”

“The repertoire begins with proclaiming the goodness of God and calling people to respond with praise,” he said. “God’s grace and faithfulness is noted in the songs of prayer, and the final section—a collection of spirituals—proclaim the greatness of God and call us to commitment to Him.”

Lifelong Learning Session for March 28 “Health Boosters: Old-time music, humor and olive oil.”

March 24, 2014

Categories: General News

Tabor College welcomes Al Schmidt, along with Don and Connie Isaac, on Friday, March 28 for its Lifelong Learning session entitled “Health Boosters: Old-time music, humor and olive oil.” The session begins at 9:45 a.m. in the Wohlgemuth Music Education Center at Tabor College in Hillsboro.

Don and Connie Isaac will show how the “good fat” in olive oil is grown and processed.

The major part of the program will feature Al Schmidt, a behavioral educator for the past five years at Via Christi’s Family Medicine Residency Program in Wichita, Kan. He will share how humor contributes to good health.

Schmidt will also play on a 12 string guitar and Marlene Fast, Director of Alumni for Tabor College, will play keyboard to provide the participants with some nostalgic music.

Schmidt grew up in rural Lehigh, Kan. and is the son of Helen and the late Eldon Schmidt. His education includes a bachelor of arts degree from Tabor College in 1972 and a masters of social work from Kansas University in 1979. He carries the following State of Kansas designations – Licensed Specialist Clinical Social Work (LSCSW) since 1981 and Licensed Clinical Marriage and Family Therapist (LCMFT) since 2000.

Among Schmidt’s favorite passages of scripture is from Proverbs 17:22, “A cheerful heart is good medicine, but a broken spirit dries up the bones.”

Don Isaac grew up on a potato and cotton farm in Shafter, Calif., while Connie spent her earliest years on a raisin farm outside of Reedley, Calif.

Don graduated from Fresno State in 1962 and Kansas State in 1964. Connie graduated from Tabor College in 1963.

From 1966 to 1980, they were both on staff at Pacific College in Fresno Calif. and raised two children.

In 1980, they moved to Hillsboro, Kan. where Don became Chair of the Tabor College Business Department and earned his Ph.D. at Kansas University in Lawrence. During the early 1990s, Connie earned a master of arts degree in church leadership from Eastern Mennonite Seminary in Harrisonburg, Va.

The Isaacs were able to purchase most of Connie’s family farm in Reedley, Calif. during the 1960s and 70s. In 2006, they planted olives on six acres of land. Connie says that in “Marion County, farmers might laugh at that because six acres in Kansas would barely grow pumpkins!”

The presentation will include products made from their olives.

The public is welcome to attend all Lifelong Learning programs and may register at the door. Fees are $4 per session or $15 per semester, or $29 per couple. Attendees may enjoy lunch in the Tabor College cafeteria after the sessions at the discounted price of $4.

For more information, contact Connie Isaac, Director of Lifelong Learning at (620)-947-5964 or conniei@tabor.edu. The semester schedule and a downloadable PDF of the brochure are available at www.tabor.edu/about/lifelong-learning.

Tabor College Theater Department presents Tennessee Williams’ classic

March 24, 2014

Categories: General News

The Tabor College Theater Department presents The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams. The production will be held April 10, 11 and 12 at 7:00 p.m. and April 13 at 2:00 p.m., in the Lab Theater, located in the lower level of the H.W. Lohrenz Building at 400 S. Jefferson in Hillsboro.

In this classic American family drama, Tom Wingfield revisits memories of a meager life with his mother, Amanda, and sister, Laura, in a small St. Louis apartment. Each of the characters sustains illusions in order to cope with harsh realities of a radically changing world, and Tom is caught between responsibility toward his family and the adventurous life he desires.

Laurel Koerner, director of Theater says this play demonstrates real life struggle.

“The play conveys a young man’s struggle between a sense of responsibility and the pursuit of fulfillment. It deftly expresses the tensions that can exist between parents and young adult children while sharing close confines,” Koerner comments.

“The well-crafted, small-cast play provides a great opportunity to focus on telling the story and telling it well,” says Koerner.

General admission: $6, Students: $4. To reserve your tickets, contact Kaylene Unruh at (620) 947-3121 ext. 1033 or via email at kayleneu@tabor.edu.

“This American classic is often considered Williams’ finest work,” Koerner closes.

Tabor College hosting business seminar on March 27

March 19, 2014

Categories: General News, Adult & Graduate

Tabor College in Wichita is hosting a Chamber of Commerce Business Builder Series seminar titled – The Triple E: Excelling in Employee Engagement – from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. Thursday, March 27 at 21st Street and Ridge Road.

This Gallup StrengthsFinder seminar is designed for business people who want to experience more employee engagement in the workplace.

For decades, the Clifton StrengthsFinder has helped people uncover their talents. Many top business executives, managers, salespeople, pastors and teachers have realized the benefits of understanding their personal strengths as they lead their organizations.

According to Gallup StrengthsFinder, people who focus on their strengths every day are six times more likely to be engaged in their jobs. They are more productive both individually and in groups.

This seminar provides the opportunity for you to identify your key strengths, develop strategies for utilizing them and for working with others more effectively.

From this seminar you will learn how to:

  • Maximize talents and strengths
  • Increase employee engagement, value and empowerment
  • Accelerate team building and collaboration

The seminar will be taught by Misty Smithson, Director of Business Services and Lewis Lee, Business Program Director, both from Tabor College in Wichita. Upon completing the seminar registration, you will receive instructions and your individual access code. This code allows you to complete your personal assessment and receive your individualized strengths report.

All attendees should bring the report to the seminar. A group discussion will take place to help you learn how to utilize your personal strengths and apply them in business.

“Tabor College is delighted to host the Wichita business community on our campus for this strengths-based seminar,” said Brett Andrews, Vice President of Tabor College in Wichita. “I believe that the content presented by our faculty will be critical to the successful development of human capital in businesses of all types.”

Registration is $40 for members and $50 for non-members. You must register by March 20th.

The class will be held at Tabor College, 7843 W. 21st Street N, Suite 117, Wichita, Kan. Register Here

This will be an amazing opportunity to engage with other business leaders as you discover your own personal strengths.

For more information about this seminar, contact Karen Bartlett at karenb@tabor.edu or call (316) 729-6333, Ext. 2306.

Human trafficking awareness week at Tabor College April 4-12

March 13, 2014

Categories: General News

The Tabor College Social Work Club and other supporters are excited to be joining the fight towards ending human trafficking and bringing awareness to this issue. The week of April 4-12 will be dedicated to human trafficking and its repercussions. All week long there will be events taking place to involve the Tabor College faculty, staff and students.

According to the Kansas Attorney General’s Office, between 2011 and 2012, there were 70 reported cases of human trafficking in the state. In 2012, 1,047 children in Kansas were abused in their own home and 3,198 foster children ran away from home due to sexual abuse.

Tabor College social work program director, Lara Vanderhoof says that, “Students of Tabor College’s Social Work Club developed a focused passion to bring about awareness and change on behalf of those who have been violated. We all have a part to play in ending modern-day slavery.”

Several people from the Set Free Movement will be coming to campus and speaking to students. The Set Free Movement is an organization that encourages holistic freedom and seeks to create new futures for survivors and those vulnerable to modern slavery. This organization was founded to help bring awareness to human trafficking and advocate for those involved.

Tabor College students see why this is an important topic to discuss publicly.

Hannah Holmes, a junior, says, “It’s important to bring awareness to the issue. Here on the campus it’s important for college students to be aware of these issues. Once we have an understanding of these issues we can move toward justice and equality and ending human trafficking.”

Here is a list of events for the week of April 4-12:

  • Friday, April 4 – Christian music concert at the Hillsboro Mennonite Brethren Church, featuring The Afters and Kyle Sherman. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and concert starts at 7:00 p.m. Tickets are $15 and can be purchased at ilivelove.org.
  • Tuesday, April 8 – Chapel speaker for Tabor College students will be Kevin Austin with the Set Free Movement at 11:00 a.m. and 11:40 a.m.
  • Tuesday, April 8 – Human Trafficking Awareness Panel at Tabor’s Chapel in the H.W. Lohrenz building on Tabor’s campus from 7:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.

Tabor College Concert Choir Tour travels to northern states March 14-23

March 12, 2014

Categories: General News

The Tabor College Concert Choir will head north for its annual spring tour, March 14-23. The choir will visit five states during the 10-day tour, performing 11 concerts.

The choir, under the direction of Dr. Brad Vogel, professor of choral music, will perform its concert series with the theme “I Lift My Voice.” “The voice is a primary means of communicating our relationship with God, in both song and speech,” Vogel said. “The texts of the songs divide into three modes of communication: praise, prayer and proclamation. Each song is either a setting of scripture or a personal expression of relationship with God.”

List of concert dates/times/locations include:

  • Friday, March 14 at 7:00 p.m. at Henderson MB Church located at 1201 11th Street in Henderson, Neb.
  • Sunday, March 16 at 10:45 a.m. at Grace Bible Church located at 310 S. Broadway in Gettysburg, S.D.
  • Sunday, March 16 at 6:00 p.m. at Bethesda Mennonite Brethren Church located at 1530 Frank Avenue SE in Huron, S.D.
  • Monday, March 17 at 10:25 a.m. at James Valley Christian located at 1550 Dakota Avenue N in Huron, S.D.
  • Monday, March 17 at 3:15 p.m. at Freeman Academy located at 748 South Main Street in Freeman, S.D.
  • Tuesday, March 18 at 7:00 p.m. at First Lutheran Church located at 410 Main Street in Onalaska, Wis.
  • Wednesday, March 19 at 7:00 p.m. at Community bible Church located at 500 Klein Street in Mt. Lake, Minn.
  • Thursday, March 20 at 7:30 p.m. at Basilica of St. Mary located at 88 North 17th Street in Minneapolis, Minn.
  • Friday, March 21 at 7:00 p.m. at Dundee Presbyterian Church located at 5312 Underwood Avenue in Omaha, Neb.
  • Sunday, March 23, 10:15 a.m. at Community Bible Church located at 1304 N. Parker in Olathe, Kan.
  • Sunday, March 23, 4:00 p.m. at Grace Episcopal Church located at 701 SW 8th Ave in Topeka, Kan.

The choir’s repertoire spans the gamut of sacred choral music, from Renaissance, Baroque and Classical motets, to contemporary sacred choral music by British, Australian, French and American composers.

A variety of accompaniment instruments will be featured in each concert, including piano, oboe, trumpet and a string quartet. Student instrumental performers include Zach Neumann, Janelle Rust and Megan Wiebe on piano, Benjamin Wiens on oboe, Matthew Wiebe on trumpet, and a string quartet of Ryan Loewen and Cheyenne Derksen on violin, Rachael Wedel on viola and Natalie Wiens on cello.

Noted for the vitality of its singing and clarity of expression, the Concert Choir has been selected to perform for the Kansas Music Educators Association State Convention five times under Vogel’s direction. It has been a guest choir twice on the Wichita State University campus, as well as selected to sing for the inauguration of Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback.

Vogel notes the focus of the concert as a “sermon in choral music.”

“The repertoire begins with proclaiming the goodness of God and calling people to respond with praise,” he said. “God’s grace and faithfulness is noted in the songs of prayer, and the final section—a collection of spirituals—proclaim the greatness of God and call us to commitment to Him.”

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